About Us

Who identifies as a Woman of Color?

  • Culture Appropriation

  • Economic Disenfranchisement

  • Genocide

  • Loss of Autonomy

  • Militarism, Targets of War & Police States 

  • Physical Displacement (Eminent Domain, Gentrification)

  • Race, Class, Gender-Based Oppression and all Intersections

  • Stolen Legacy 

The political term woman of color surfaced in the violence against women movement in the late 70s to unify all women experiencing multiple layers of marginalization with race and ethnicity as a common issue.  In today’s sociopolitical context, we use the term to intentionally transcend social constructs and to unite, by relationship, those women with the following shared global experiences:  

The Women of Color series is an initiative in the Flora Stone Mather Center for Women for all members of the CWRU community (student, staff, and faculty), regardless of gender, who are interested in advocating for intersectional feminism and equity for all women. Now in its third year, the series is dedicated to inclusion and advocacy for marginalized women who identify as women of color based on their race and/or ethnicity. The focus is on identifying way to learn and grow in our perspectives to ensure we are supporting a more inclusive gender equity movement. Within the series, an intergenerational mentoring circle engages those who identify as women of color. The circle helps them build a support network, navigate barriers to access, and build allies in their journey towards equity. 

 

Within the series, an intergenerational mentoring circle exclusively engages those who identify as women of color. The circle helps members build a support network, navigate barriers to access, and build allies in their journey towards gender equity. In the sessions, individuals who identify as women of color discuss communication and the importance of camaraderie within an intersectional movement. Participants discuss how they can move from conversation to dialogue as well as ways to move from talk to action to equity. In addition, participants showcase stories of intersectional feminists and their self-care rituals. Topics such as mindfulness and meditation for women of color play an intricate role in helping participants establish our voices and appreciate our beauty, our voices, and our intelligence.

As an outcome, participants of the series worked together to establish the Family Equity Committee. This committee brings staff and faculty members who are committed to increasing access to alternative family building for employees who utilize CWRU health care plans. Through comparative research of similar AAU universities across the country, the committee has developed a series of recommendations for administration focused in three primary areas: assisted reproductive technology, adoption, and foster care support.

Ellipsis Color.png